Sunday, November 15, 2015

Craftstead update




Growing winter spinach
Part of my "craftstead" philosophy includes trying to grow at least some of my own food on my small suburban plot. Here I am experimenting with growing spinach in a cold frame in my backyard. The frame is right behind my house and will have the advantage of whatever heat the house gives off.

I was encouraged to read about the Northwest Brightmoor Renaissance   a group trying to rehabilitate a blighted former working class community in Detroit--by cleaning up the trash that's been dumped there, fixing up the modest homes and yes, growing some of their own food.  And it is definitely not another gentrification project, but a real grassroots effort to carve out an affordable American Dream in an urban wilderness.
Sprounting mung beans on the kitchen counter: fresh homegrown produce.
I love how Brightmoor residents are using the Internet to catch and shame those who have used their neighborhood as a dumping ground. Visiting their website, you can see some really cute little houses on nice sized lots. What a great place to have a nice big garden! I read in the Washington Post that one couple chose the neighborhood to begin their organic farming enterprise, rather than a rural area. They are also using vacant lots for community gardens.  Yes, dedicated people can change the world.

I will have warm feet this year!
My craftstead is in a posh suburb where cute smaller houses are being torn down to create mansions. So my 1500 square foot 70's split is "small" compared to a McMansion of five thousand plus square feet. Funny to hear myself calling my house "small." It isn't by global standards. My house is giant and luxurious. It has plenty of room to raise a family, throw a dinner party, host guests, and house a few looms and spinning wheels.

But I understand what drives people to wanting giant homes and buying new stuff. It's a disease that plagues our society--consumerism--an endless Pack-Man like need to run the maze and eat the cherries of new acquisitions. It's like we have lost our souls and try to fill the void with stuff. Yes, I've struggled with the endless wanting and have fought to keep it at bay. One thing that has helped me is having a "small" house. I can only fit so much into it.


3 comments:

  1. Oh Rose! Your posts make my heart shine! We're like minded when it comes to excess and our want of it. Trying to change is tough. But your efforts give me hope.

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  2. Thanks! But honestly, it isn't easy. I keep fighting with myself to keep from adding more "stuff" to my life. Of course, accumulating all things fibery is my biggest consumer addiction.

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  3. I AGREE WITH YOU ... MANY TRY TO COMPENSATE FOR SOMETHING THAT THEY FEEL ARE LACKING IN THEIR LIVES.... REAL AND TRUE LIFE IS BRUSHING SHOULDERS AND BEING CLOSE TO YOUR FAMILY. I LIVE IN A 1800 SQ FT HOME AND RIGHT ABOUT NOW A TUMBLEWEED HOME IS STARTING TO LOOK GOOD.

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